Your blood pressure is 106 over 85?


What your blood pressure values mean

Your blood pressure is: Prehypertension / High normal

But regarding your systolic (upper) value your blood pressure is rather: Ideal!

If you are getting two different types of classification for your blood pressure it is more likely to chose the one that is considered worse, e.g. if your systolic (upper) value is 'normal' and your diastolic (lower) value is 'high normal', consider 'high normal' as your classification.


Scale / Classification as diagram

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Diastolic value
(lower)




Your blood pressure is high normal.

Requirement for a high normal blood pressure is a value of 130-139 over 85-89.

If your systolic (upper) would increase from 106 mmHg to 14 mmHg and your diastolic (lower) value would increase by -5 mmHg your blood pressure would be no more 'high normal' but 'Hypertension Stage 1'.

What if I continuously have high blood pressure?


If you have a high blood pressure reading, you should consult with your doctor to set up a series of blood pressure screenings to assess any long-term trends. If your doctor regularly checks your blood pressure after an initial reading and it stays high over time (Above 140/90 mm HG), more than likely you will be placed on medication to help lower your blood pressure. Also, your doctor will also assess other contributing lifestyle factors and make a series of recommendations to help you lower your blood pressure.


What are some lifestyle factors that I can control


Those with normal high blood pressure, or pre-hypertension, should seriously look at the following lifestyle factors that can be controlled in order to reduce one's risk for the development of stage one and stage two hypertension. These lifestyle factors include:
  • Diet - Limit the intake of sodium, fatty foods and processed foods such as starchy carbohydrates
  • Exercise - Engage in at least 45 to 60 minutes of moderate aerobic activities every day
  • Sleep - Get at least eight hours of sleep a night
  • Stress - Control activities and or events in life that contribute to stress
  • Alcohol - Limit alcohol intake throughout the week
  • Smoking - Stop smoking all tobacco products


  • High blood pressure can be controlled and eliminated all together. All it takes is being conscious of one's lifestyle and regularly consulting with a physician.


    Additional information